At Least 3 Climbers Dead, 1 Missing After Tragic Weekend On Mount Everest

Three Mount Everest climbers were reported dead Sunday, with a fourth climber missing after getting separated from his guide.

Roland Yearwood, a 50-year-old Alabama doctor, was among those who died, Nepal tourism officials told The Washington Post. Yearwood had taken on the world?s highest mountain before, surviving a massive earthquake during his 2015 attempt to scale Everest, according to AL.com. His wife, Amrita Yearwood, described her husband at the time as ?adventurous? and someone who ?doesn?t get freaked out.?

Everest Parivar Expedition agency spokesperson Murari Sharma told the Chicago Tribune that specifics of Yearwood?s death were not immediately known, though he reportedly died near the mountain?s summit.

Two other climbers also died Sunday. Slovakian climber Vladimir Strba and Australian climber Francesco Enrico died from altitude sickness, according to The Himalayan Times.

Search teams continue to look for Ravi Kumar, an Indian climber missing since Saturday. Kumar made it to the summit, but both he and his Nepali guide fell sick, the Post reports. The guide left Kumar with a supply of oxygen and went down the mountain to find help. Though the guide made it to a camp, teams have not been able to locate Kumar.

This year, The Nepalese Tourism Department has issued a record number of permits for climbing Everest. As of early May, it had issued permits to 317 climbers, according to the Associated Press.

Guide Tendi Sherpa told the Post that 60 people made it to the top on Sunday, but there were also numerous helicopter evacuations for crises like frostbite and altitude sickness.

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Fidget Spinners, What’s the Deal?

Fidget Spinners are driving teachers mad all over the country – much like the dreaded laser pointers from back in my day, although we didn?t try to claim therapeutic effects by way of the distracting red light. The Spinners are claiming to help with anxiety and ADHD, but the evidence is anecdotal at best and BS marketing at worst.

Child psychologists Dr. Dave Anderson, Scott Kollins, and Victoria Prooday have all said that there is no evidence that Fidget Spinners help with ADHD or anxiety, and instead serve as a distraction due to the instant gratification of the toy. In this light, it seems like the perfect toy for our time.

There are tried and tested methods that can help children with ADHD and anxiety relief and these entertainment toys should not be used as an excuse for kids to be disruptive in classrooms. Although, maybe they will help children develop their debating skills as they plead their cases to teachers across the country to keep their toy spinning on their desks. However, as Dr. Anderson notes, one positive about them is they have brought attention to the discussion about what CAN help anxiety and ADHD.

If you don?t understand why people are into spinning pieces of plastic all of a sudden, Michael McCrudden traces the Fidget Spinner?s history back to its 1997 origin in the video above. This is a trend that?s 20 years in the making.

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